Summertime in LBC features hip-hop artists at the Queen Mary

Richard Guzman of the Press-Telegram fills us in on the Summertime in the LBC show this weekend.

“This summer Long Beach will be all about hip-hop, with some of the most influential old-school performers coming to the Queen Mary for a one-day concert on Aug. 5, beginning at noon.

The Summertime in the LBC concert includes performances from more than a dozen acts. It features a mix of mostly hip-hop veterans and a few other performers from closely related genres as well.

The concert includes headliner 50 Cent & G-Unit, along with YG, the Wu-Tang Clan, KRS-One, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony, Warren G, Slick Rick, George Clinton Parliament Funkadelic and others.

It’s an impressive lineup of talent, so it’s no surprise that when it comes to the hip-hop heart of the show, many of the acts on the bill helped define the genre in one way or another.

So as Summertime in the LBC approaches, we look at how five of these artists left their mark on hip-hop.

50 Cent

He was a protege of Dr. Dre and Eminem, and it would be hard to find someone who hasn’t danced to his smash hit “In Da Club.”

Wu-Tang Clan

Amidst the dominance of gangsta rap in the 1990s this New York group rose to become one of the most revolutionary acts in hip-hop. It was originally made up of almost a dozen rappers that included RZA, Method Man, Raekwon Ghostface Killah and the unforgettable Ol’ Dirty Bastard.

Bones Thugs-N-Harmony

This Cleveland group brought an unexpected but incredibly catchy mix of harmony to hip-hop by blending soft melodies with rapid fire rap lyrics and sung verses.

Warren G

It’s impossible to think of 1990s West Coast hip-hop, and Long Beach, without thinking about Warren G. Warren grew up in Long Beach and along with Nate and Snoop Dogg started the group 213, which defined the sound of 1990s West Coast hip-hop thanks to tracks like Warren G’s 1994 hit “Regulate,” the most memorable song from his triple-platinum album “Regulate … G Funk Era.”

KRS-One

The Bronx rapper was one of the pioneering voices back in the late 1980s and early ’90s when it came to socially and politically conscious hip-hop. KRS-One has blended hip-hop with rock, reggae and alternative sounds to drive his anti-violence message.

Tickets begin at $75.

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s